Print

Print


Steven
There are two things in this conversation that need to be separated,  
one is the personal need or urge to act or in some way to relieve or  
mediate differences. The other is different from the act or urge but  
deeply connected to it, that is the need to look at one's self and  
the resulting consequences of events on individual growth and  
understanding.

Too often a person or group will decide for various reasons, good and  
bad, that collective action should be taken and then we have wars and  
what have you, good and bad. Dialogue supports inquiry and without  
inquiry there is a diminished sense of the collective consciousness  
of the community. Without that level of consciousness wars and the  
wars to end wars will be with us. Once we are allowed to engage in  
inquiry we get a better sense of ourselves and of the community we  
identify with. Acting at that level has a more effective sense of  
integrity and a response that might make more sense (to me).

I believe that the roots of genocide and war and the political and  
economic disparities lies in the supporting assumptions that go  
unexamined. Dialogue, that includes open and unmediated inquiry  
(Bohmian) that can reveal these precursors to communal violence and  
abuse. Once they are engaged and we have a de-facto genocide then  
each of us is bound to act according to our conscience, in support or  
in opposition - the symptom is war, and inevitable. Where do we  
intervene to break the cycle. Choose what works best from your level  
of consciousness, I don't intend to go to war to make you agree with  
me and I hope you will not impose your view on me by force or  
intimidation. Rather, lets talk about what is within us individually  
to see where our consciousness is focused. Inquiry is a fine art that  
improves and strengthens with practice.

Rogier Gregoire

On Jul 6, 2007, at 8:49 AM, Steven M wrote:

> When genocide occurs, the entire civilized world has a  
> responsibility to intervene. Try telling the victims of genocide  
> that our American identity is too abstract to take concrete action.  
> I guarantee you, they sense their own ethnicity/nationality  
> identity all too clearly in times like that.
>
>> Thread deleted