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NCDD-DISCUSSION  November 2010, Week 4

NCDD-DISCUSSION November 2010, Week 4

Subject:

Re: ACE: Participants as activists for a culture of dialogue?

From:

Rogier Gregoire <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

Rogier Gregoire <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Sat, 27 Nov 2010 20:49:59 -0700

Content-Type:

text/plain

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Parts/Attachments

text/plain (431 lines)

It seems that the efficacy of dialogue Bohmian or otherwise is not  
determined or evaluated by the number of people who practice or  
participate irregularly or regularly for any length of time. There is  
a general resistance to diversity in our society. A general resistance  
that is only exceeded by the inability of almost all to engage in  
inquiry even when practicing their own favorite form of dialogue. Most  
of the suggestions seem to be aimed at making those other guys (take  
your pick) conform to our (my) idea of what is equitable. There is an  
epidemic of racism in our society and the circular firing squad is  
fervently at work.

So let me return to Howard's suggestions regarding Bohmian dialogue  
and the intrinsic quality of inquiry not just in the critical  
evaluation of the assumptions that others have, but our own  
assumptions. If you participate in a Bohmian dialogue for many years  
and never once asked yourself if the assumptions I hold can survive  
critical and affectionate examination then you've wasted your time and  
the time of those you have been dialogue with all that time.

Looking at your own biases and unsubstantiated assumptions is  
difficult work, but it is the only work that has any meaning in either  
an individual or collective effort to undo racism and bias of any  
sort. If you want to stop racism stop it in your own sense of reality  
first, then, in the way you lead that transformed and transcendent  
life will change everything that matters.

I appreciate the concern and enthusiasm that this topic raises. As an  
old Black man I don't believe that I will see the benefits of a  
collective move against institutional and individual racism until the  
society moves towards clear and critical independent thinking at a  
level where at least the thoughts of such an ideal can be shared for  
examination.

I am a human being unlike any other human being but like everyone else  
essential to the integrity of the holo.

The no label movement is a farce driven by the ineptitude of the mass  
media machinery that has driven critical thinking form the human  
habit. Who cares whether we agree or not, it is more important that we  
understand our differences. As the great Sufi masters have suggested  
there are only two questions that occupy human interest, the first is  
"What is this?" and the second is "Who am I?" both inextricable bound  
together. The first searches for an object and the other for the  
process. We should enjoy and revel in our differences for the bounty  
they provide and the happiness they support.

Rogier Gregoire

On Nov 27, 2010, at 6:22 PM, Tom Atlee wrote:

> Hello Howard!
>
> Having participated in a weekly Bohm Dialogue group for 2.5 years in  
> the early 90's, I am aware of that approach, and feature it on co- 
> intelligence.org webpage on dialogue (http://co-intelligence.org/P-dialogue.html 
> ).  I enthusiastically support any efforts to spread and practice  
> Bohm Dialogue.
>
> My concern with making it central to something like ACE is the  
> unsettling reality that so few people seem interested in it -- even  
> among dialogue professionals -- and that it takes considerable  
> commitment to achieve the kind of consciousness-insight you refer  
> to.  With 237,000,000 adults and 73,000,000 children in the U.S. --  
> most of whom could care less about this sort of personal development  
> -- I have difficulty imagining how we could raise the consciousness  
> of even a tenth of them using Bohm dialogue.
>
> So I try to think of D&D practices that have a higher leverage --  
> things that might create a profound impact on the level of  
> collective intelligence and wisdom of the whole society with minimal  
> investment of resources.  One approach to this is to use high  
> quality citizen deliberation on public issues, such as we find in  
> Citizens Juries, Consensus Conferences, and Citizens Assemblies,  
> where a relatively small group -- a randomly selected cross-section  
> of the population -- are given informational and facilitation  
> support for a near-ideal exercise in deliberative citizenship for  
> several days to a week or more.  They collect and evaluate full- 
> spectrum information on a public issue and on options for its  
> resolution and then produce findings and recommendations for use by  
> the broader public, media, and official decision-makers.
>
> Information and statements from such citizen deliberative councils  
> can then be included in more broadly participatory but less intense  
> and thorough citizen deliberative efforts such as National Issues  
> Forums, Study Circles, Deliberative Polls, 21st Century Town  
> Meetings, etc., as well as for exploration through mass- 
> participation dialogue approaches like World Cafe and Conversation  
> Cafe.
>
> This approach can generate a high quality of "public judgment"  
> through a few expensive but very intense and deep deliberations.   
> Then that concentrated public wisdom can be digested, disseminated  
> and assimilated through less expensive forms of citizen deliberation  
> and public dialogue that can reach millions of people.
>
> I also would love to see stakeholder dialogues and creative,  
> transformative approaches like Wisdom Councils get used to generate  
> alternative perspectives and options that can then be subject to the  
> thorough reflection we find in citizen deliberative councils.  And,  
> of course, action on any particular issue can be promoted through  
> methods like Open Space and Study Circles programs.
>
> Online dialogues and deliberations add whole new realms of this  
> dynamic to explore and develop.  We are just beginning to understand  
> the synergies possible between online, face-to-face, and enhanced  
> conference call conversations (like Maestro Conferencing).
>
> I've noticed that diverse people -- and diversity is very important  
> in this -- coming together in well-facilitated D&D (or choice  
> creating exercises like Wisdom Councils and Creative Insight  
> Councils) -- especially when they are tasked with coming up with  
> something useful for the larger community -- tend to move beyond  
> whatever polarized boxes they may be used to so that they start  
> really (as you so aptly put it) "listening to one another and  
> exploring together."
>
> A few years back I wrote an article for Integral Review's special  
> edition on politics (the pdf "Integral Politics as Process" on p.  
> 274 of http://www.integral-review.org/current_issue/politics-issue_index.asp) 
>  where I noted that people in such groups tend to manifest together  
> a higher level of awareness than they do individually in their  
> everyday lives, simply by being facilitated in a way that enables  
> them to hear and stretch into the different perspectives of their  
> fellow participants.  They soon come to see a bigger picture, deepen  
> their sensibilities, and then choose wiser options.  It matters  
> little if they drift back into their former awareness level after  
> they leave the conversation IF -- and this is a critical IF -- what  
> they discovered when they were in their higher state of awareness is  
> given power to impact policy and/or to enlighten their fellow  
> citizens.  Through well-designed dialogue, deliberation, and choice- 
> creating, ordinary people can become wisdom teachers for the whole  
> society.
>
> Luckily, we can actually design social and political institutions  
> that make that possible, even normal and expected.  The fact that  
> the participants in such forums experience a "citizenship high" when  
> they participate can provide a strong motivation for them to help  
> put those social and political institutions in place, and to defend  
> them and monitor them to maintain their quality and power.
>
> In the meantime, any efforts to raise the ongoing awareness of as  
> many citizens as possible -- from Bohm Dialogue to meditation to  
> systems thinking to shamanic practice and deep ecology -- will  
> produce people who, when they enter into any of these forums, will  
> raise the level of awareness even further.  (Note that an  
> enlightened person in an unfacilitated polarized battle zone may be  
> totally ignored, whereas when they are present in a forum where  
> people are being helped to hear each other, what they say has a much  
> better chance of being heard and taken to heart.)
>
> I view all approaches and theories of conversational power as part  
> of the "culture of dialogue" picture we need to paint.  Their/Our  
> diversity is a potential resource IF we can set aside our egos,  
> fixed ideas, and professional turf sensibilities long enough to  
> notice what their diverse gifts and limitations are and where they  
> fit in the larger pattern of participatory collective wisdom and  
> evolutionary capacity.  If we become sophisticated about the  
> different uses of different processes, and of their underlying  
> dynamics (as in the "pattern language on group process" that Tree  
> Bressen and others are developing http://grouppatternlanguage.org/wagn/Home) 
>  then we can build a whole ecosystem of conversational activities  
> that have far more power than any of our processes can generate alone.
>
> Which takes us into the field of multi-process conversational design  
> (http://co-intelligence.org/DD-MultiProcessPgms.html) and the  
> institutionalization of powerful designs in every corner and at ever  
> level of our society.  At the point where conversational  
> infrastructure is as ubiquitous and sophisticated as  
> telecommunications infrastructure, we will have made it as a  
> society! :)
>
> coheartedly,
>
> Tom
>
> http://co-intelligence.org
>
>
> On Nov 27, 2010, at 10:38 AM, Howard Ward wrote:
>
>> Hello Tom & all - I also agree, "the sooner, the better..." I also  
>> think the responses to your proposal made some great points. I  
>> liked both of the videos shared so far. The No Label video seems to  
>> reflect a widely shared sentiment that polarization isn't a healthy  
>> response to the many challenges we face. But I'd like to suggest  
>> that this polarization is really just a reflection of the current  
>> state of human consciousness. My only problem with the No Label  
>> video is one statement made in the video. That statement was: "We  
>> Understand The Problem." If we don't understand the nature of the  
>> polarization, then I suggest we don't actually understand the  
>> problem. Understanding the fact that people disagree or have  
>> different opinions is not the same thing as understanding  
>> polarization.
>>
>> This brings me to my suggestion, or addition, to your proposal. As  
>> always I suggest that what we need mostly is 'a change in  
>> understanding', which was pointed out by Einstein when he suggested  
>> that: "We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking  
>> we used when we created them."
>>
>> The point is that despite all the good ideas you have put forward,  
>> the great points others have added, and the promotion of 'common  
>> sense solutions' in the No Label Video, the actuality is that  
>> people, in general, are fragmented and divided over their  
>> 'thoughts', their beliefs and opinions.
>>
>> So, I share your interest in 'creating of dialogue and  
>> deliberation'. But I'd like to suggest a greater emphasis on  
>> dialogue. An exploratory dialogue which goes deeper than most  
>> dialogues tend to do.
>>
>> My concern is that all the attempts to motivate and organize the  
>> society in a particular direction, without getting at the root  
>> incoherence in thought, will fail to produce the desired goal.
>>
>> This is why I feel compelled from time to time to raise the Bohmian  
>> Dialogue issue in this group. But let me be more specific today. If  
>> the 'dialogue culture' you/we create, doesn't 'get beneath the  
>> surface' of just 'sharing beliefs and opinions', then not much will  
>> change. People may alter their beliefs a bit, but that shouldn't be  
>> confused for: "We Understand The Problem."
>>
>> As I've suggested before, what we often call 'the problem', is  
>> really just a 'symptom' of the problem. "Polarization' is a  
>> 'symptom'. The 'lack of well-being' is a 'symptom' of our problem.  
>> The 'problem' is incoherence in thought, and our failure to be  
>> aware of 'what thought is doing'.
>>
>> The mess we humans are creating simply reflects our current state  
>> of understanding, or current state of human consciousness.  
>> Fortunately, we humans have the capacity for insight, and a  
>> capacity to observe what works and what doesn't. Generally  
>> speaking, humans tend to think the solution to our problems is to  
>> "think" about them. But as David Bohm attempted to point out,  
>> "thought" is not the proper tool for this. Thought is limited and  
>> based on past knowledge. Thought does have a role to play, but it  
>> doesn't contain new understanding. Learning to respond in a new way  
>> requires awareness, observation, and our innate intelligence that  
>> is available when we open up to it.  But instead of 'openly  
>> exploring and examining', we tend to cling to abstract beliefs and  
>> opinions because, generally speaking, we confuse these 'abstract  
>> thoughts' for "the actual truth." It's this 'incoherence in  
>> thought' that needs to be directly observed and clearly understood.
>>
>> If we keep confusing 'beliefs and opinions' for 'the actual', then  
>> we will continue to fragment and divide ourselves, and every good  
>> suggestion (like yours and others made here) will die a quick  
>> death, as people dismiss it's merits based on contrary abstract  
>> beliefs.
>>
>> My suggestion is that the 'dialogue culture' we need to create is  
>> one that 'goes deeper' than just 'sharing ideas, beliefs, and  
>> opinions'. It also needs to be an 'experiential dialogue' where we  
>> begin to 'know ourselves' intimately. Where we 'get intimate' with  
>> the actual nature of 'belief'. And where we discover why David Bohm  
>> suggested that we humans need a 'Proprioception of Thought'. An  
>> awareness of what 'thought' is doing in human relationship.
>>
>> If we don't understand ourselves and what 'thought is doing', then  
>> I suggest "We Don't Understand The Problem."
>>
>> But when we are aware of what thought is doing, then we are aware  
>> of some of the concerns people have raised here, like when  
>> manipulation is occurring, or when polarization is occurring, etc.,  
>> etc.
>>
>> So that's my long-winded way of saying that "I'm with you." I just  
>> think that in order to be successful in this venture it will  
>> require 'getting beneath the surface' in the dialogue segment of  
>> the venture, or, the current 'fragmented state' will 'prevail'.
>>
>> We need to 'remove the blocks' to an openness to listening to one  
>> another and exploring together. And that's what a 'deeper  
>> exploratory dialogue' can shed some light on...it seems to me.
>>
>> Regards - Howard
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: Tom Atlee <[log in to unmask]>
>>> Sent: Nov 26, 2010 7:21 AM
>>> To: [log in to unmask]
>>> Subject: [NCDD-DISCUSSION] ACE: Participants as activists for a  
>>> culture of dialogue?
>>>
>>> Dear NCDD and IAP2 friends,
>>>
>>> I want us to expand our efforts to create a culture of dialogue  
>>> and deliberation.  I believe this is particularly urgent in the  
>>> US, because US public policy has a disproportional impact on the  
>>> wellbeing of everyone on Earth and on the future of the planet.   
>>> So the sooner, the better...
>>>
>>> I don't think our professional networks (like NCDD and IAP2) are  
>>> sufficient to birth that conversation-based political culture.  We  
>>> need help.  Lots of it.  I believe it is time to engage current  
>>> and former participants in public dialogue and deliberation as  
>>> active agents of change in this direction.
>>>
>>> From all the evidence I see, the vast majority of people who  
>>> participate in organized conversations on public affairs are  
>>> profoundly affected by the experience.  Most of them discover a  
>>> richer form of citizenship than they have ever known before and  
>>> are quite excited about that.  They feel listened to and empowered.
>>>
>>> That excitement and empowerment constitute an as-yet-untapped  
>>> resources for birthing a culture of high quality, high impact  
>>> dialogue and deliberation.  These citizens have sensed a form of  
>>> citizenship they would love to see practiced more broadly and  
>>> taken seriously in official decision-making.  They sense it could  
>>> really help their communities and their country.
>>>
>>> Their primary concern is that officials or the public will ignore  
>>> the results of their good work -- and this is often the case.   
>>> Some also have concerns about the quality of the process they have  
>>> just been through.  These concerns are assets:  BECAUSE they are  
>>> diverse and concerned but quite ordinary citizens, they are both  
>>> well motivated and well positioned to promote the use, quality and  
>>> influence of organized public conversation.  (Who better to  
>>> impartially monitor the quality of process and facilitation in  
>>> official participatory democracy initiatives and institutions than  
>>> a network of process-aware ordinary citizens?)
>>>
>>> To have an impact, these folks just need to get organized.  That's  
>>> where we come in.
>>>
>>> I suggest that this source of transformational power could be  
>>> brought into being relatively quickly by us -- members of NCDD and  
>>> IAP2.  We convene and facilitate SO many public conversations in  
>>> the U.S.  We have direct access to the participants in those  
>>> conversations.  We could talk with some of our most enthusiastic  
>>> recent citizen participants about forming an organization -- or  
>>> perhaps both a non-profit and a lobbying organization -- of, by,  
>>> and for those participants who want to catalyze a culture of  
>>> strong citizen engagement in public affairs.
>>>
>>> Below is one possible vision for such an organization.
>>>
>>> Please share your thoughts, critiques, creative ideas, and desires  
>>> to participate in realizing such a vision.  I think it could make  
>>> all the difference in the world.
>>>
>>> Coheartedly,
>>> Tom Atlee
>>> Co-Intelligence.org
>>>
>>> ==============
>>>
>>> AMERICAN CITIZENS ENGAGED (ACE)
>>>
>>> An interest group / network of current and former participants in  
>>> organized public conversation and deliberation on public issues.
>>>
>>> PURPOSE
>>>
>>> To promote the growth of a dynamic culture of quality public  
>>> dialogue and deliberation in the U.S.A. - as part of a broader  
>>> engagement of citizens actively co-creating the long-term  
>>> wellbeing of their communities, country and world.
>>>
>>> FUNCTIONS
>>>
>>> *  Social networking - promotes social activity, friendship and  
>>> conversation among diverse public engagement participants
>>> *  Advocacy - strategizes, educates, organizes and lobbies for  
>>> broader use of citizen engagement that is effective, judicious,  
>>> and empowered
>>> *  Quality Assurance - reviews major citizen engagement  
>>> initiatives and monitors citizen engagement institutions,  
>>> publicizing its critical and appreciative findings
>>> *  Fundraising - promotes to the philanthropic community the value  
>>> of funding high quality citizen engagement and public participation
>>> *  Research - promotes studies into factors that influence the  
>>> use, quality, impact and appreciation of citizen engagement  
>>> practices and institutions
>>> *  Training - trains members in dialogic political theory,  
>>> facilitation, PR and advocacy work, coalition-building and other  
>>> skills to support the network's purpose
>>> *  Projects - organizes and catalyzes efforts that further the  
>>> network's purpose, usually in collaboration with other  
>>> organizations and networks
>>>
>>> ALLIES
>>>
>>> *  ACE would liaise closely with NCDD, IAP2, League of Women  
>>> Voters and other networks of public engagement professionals --  
>>> especially to recruit new ACE members, but also to evaluate public  
>>> engagement proposals, processes, initiatives and institutions.
>>> *  ACE would work with participation-oriented politicians, public  
>>> officials, and media to promote understanding of and demand for  
>>> citizen engagement in governance.
>>> *  ACE would collaborate with academics and philanthropists to  
>>> pursue projects of mutual interest.
>>> *  ACE would work with groups promoting volunteerism, activism,  
>>> stakeholder conversations, community renewal and resilience, and  
>>> other public betterment organizations to promote broader, more  
>>> effective and integrated citizen engagement in public affairs.
>>> ---
>>>
>>> NCDD's discussion and announcement lists are generously provided  
>>> by L-Soft ( www.lsoft.com ) and are powered by L-Soft's LISTSERV  
>>> mailing list management software ( www.lsoft.com/LISTSERV-powered.html 
>>>  ).  Learn more about NCDD's email lists in the community section  
>>> of the NCDD website ( www.thataway.org/community/lists/ ).  Please  
>>> read this mailing list's rules ( www.thataway.org/community/listrules 
>>>  ) before you post.
>>
>> ---
>>
>> NCDD's discussion and announcement lists are generously provided by  
>> L-Soft ( www.lsoft.com ) and are powered by L-Soft's LISTSERV  
>> mailing list management software ( www.lsoft.com/LISTSERV-powered.html 
>>  ).  Learn more about NCDD's email lists in the community section  
>> of the NCDD website ( www.thataway.org/community/lists/ ).  Please  
>> read this mailing list's rules ( www.thataway.org/community/ 
>> listrules ) before you post.
>
> ---
>
> NCDD's discussion and announcement lists are generously provided by  
> L-Soft ( www.lsoft.com ) and are powered by L-Soft's LISTSERV  
> mailing list management software ( www.lsoft.com/LISTSERV- 
> powered.html ).  Learn more about NCDD's email lists in the  
> community section of the NCDD website ( www.thataway.org/community/lists/ 
>  ).  Please read this mailing list's rules ( www.thataway.org/community/listrules 
>  ) before you post.

---

NCDD's discussion and announcement lists are generously provided by L-Soft ( www.lsoft.com ) and are powered by L-Soft's LISTSERV mailing list management software ( www.lsoft.com/LISTSERV-powered.html ).  Learn more about NCDD's email lists in the community section of the NCDD website ( www.thataway.org/community/lists/ ).  Please read this mailing list's rules ( www.thataway.org/community/listrules ) before you post.

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June 2014, Week 2
June 2014, Week 1
May 2014, Week 5
May 2014, Week 4
May 2014, Week 3
May 2014, Week 2
May 2014, Week 1
April 2014, Week 5
April 2014, Week 4
April 2014, Week 3
April 2014, Week 2
April 2014, Week 1
March 2014, Week 5
March 2014, Week 4
March 2014, Week 3
March 2014, Week 2
March 2014, Week 1
February 2014, Week 4
February 2014, Week 3
February 2014, Week 2
February 2014, Week 1
January 2014, Week 5
January 2014, Week 4
January 2014, Week 3
January 2014, Week 2
January 2014, Week 1
December 2013, Week 5
December 2013, Week 4
December 2013, Week 3
December 2013, Week 2
December 2013, Week 1
November 2013, Week 4
November 2013, Week 3
November 2013, Week 2
November 2013, Week 1
October 2013, Week 5
October 2013, Week 4
October 2013, Week 3
October 2013, Week 2
October 2013, Week 1
September 2013, Week 5
September 2013, Week 4
September 2013, Week 3
September 2013, Week 2
September 2013, Week 1
August 2013, Week 5
August 2013, Week 4
August 2013, Week 3
August 2013, Week 2
August 2013, Week 1
July 2013, Week 5
July 2013, Week 4
July 2013, Week 3
July 2013, Week 2
July 2013, Week 1
June 2013, Week 4
June 2013, Week 3
June 2013, Week 2
June 2013, Week 1
May 2013, Week 5
May 2013, Week 4
May 2013, Week 3
May 2013, Week 2
May 2013, Week 1
April 2013, Week 5
April 2013, Week 4
April 2013, Week 3
April 2013, Week 2
April 2013, Week 1
March 2013, Week 5
March 2013, Week 4
March 2013, Week 3
March 2013, Week 2
March 2013, Week 1
February 2013, Week 4
February 2013, Week 3
February 2013, Week 2
February 2013, Week 1
January 2013, Week 5
January 2013, Week 4
January 2013, Week 3
January 2013, Week 2
January 2013, Week 1
December 2012, Week 4
December 2012, Week 3
December 2012, Week 2
December 2012, Week 1
November 2012, Week 4
November 2012, Week 3
November 2012, Week 2
November 2012, Week 1
October 2012, Week 5
October 2012, Week 4
October 2012, Week 3
October 2012, Week 2
October 2012, Week 1
September 2012, Week 5
September 2012, Week 4
September 2012, Week 3
September 2012, Week 2
September 2012, Week 1
August 2012, Week 5
August 2012, Week 4
August 2012, Week 3
August 2012, Week 2
August 2012, Week 1
July 2012, Week 5
July 2012, Week 4
July 2012, Week 3
July 2012, Week 2
July 2012, Week 1
June 2012, Week 5
June 2012, Week 4
June 2012, Week 3
June 2012, Week 2
June 2012, Week 1
May 2012, Week 5
May 2012, Week 4
May 2012, Week 3
May 2012, Week 2
May 2012, Week 1
April 2012, Week 5
April 2012, Week 4
April 2012, Week 3
April 2012, Week 2
April 2012, Week 1
March 2012, Week 5
March 2012, Week 4
March 2012, Week 3
March 2012, Week 2
March 2012, Week 1
February 2012, Week 4
February 2012, Week 3
February 2012, Week 2
February 2012, Week 1
January 2012, Week 5
January 2012, Week 4
January 2012, Week 3
January 2012, Week 2
January 2012, Week 1
December 2011, Week 5
December 2011, Week 4
December 2011, Week 3
December 2011, Week 2
December 2011, Week 1
November 2011, Week 5
November 2011, Week 4
November 2011, Week 3
November 2011, Week 2
November 2011, Week 1
October 2011, Week 5
October 2011, Week 4
October 2011, Week 3
October 2011, Week 2
October 2011, Week 1
September 2011, Week 5
September 2011, Week 4
September 2011, Week 3
September 2011, Week 2
September 2011, Week 1
August 2011, Week 5
August 2011, Week 4
August 2011, Week 3
August 2011, Week 2
August 2011, Week 1
July 2011, Week 5
July 2011, Week 4
July 2011, Week 3
July 2011, Week 2
July 2011, Week 1
June 2011, Week 5
June 2011, Week 4
June 2011, Week 3
June 2011, Week 2
June 2011, Week 1
May 2011, Week 5
May 2011, Week 4
May 2011, Week 3
May 2011, Week 2
May 2011, Week 1
April 2011, Week 5
April 2011, Week 4
April 2011, Week 3
April 2011, Week 2
April 2011, Week 1
March 2011, Week 5
March 2011, Week 4
March 2011, Week 3
March 2011, Week 2
March 2011, Week 1
February 2011, Week 4
February 2011, Week 3
February 2011, Week 2
February 2011, Week 1
January 2011, Week 4
January 2011, Week 3
January 2011, Week 2
January 2011, Week 1
December 2010, Week 5
December 2010, Week 3
December 2010, Week 2
December 2010, Week 1
November 2010, Week 5
November 2010, Week 4
November 2010, Week 3
November 2010, Week 2
November 2010, Week 1
October 2010, Week 5
October 2010, Week 4
October 2010, Week 3
October 2010, Week 2
October 2010, Week 1
September 2010, Week 5
September 2010, Week 4
September 2010, Week 3
September 2010, Week 2
September 2010, Week 1
August 2010, Week 5
August 2010, Week 4
August 2010, Week 3
August 2010, Week 2
August 2010, Week 1
July 2010, Week 5
July 2010, Week 4
July 2010, Week 3
July 2010, Week 2
July 2010, Week 1
June 2010, Week 5
June 2010, Week 4
June 2010, Week 3
June 2010, Week 2
June 2010, Week 1
May 2010, Week 5
May 2010, Week 4
May 2010, Week 3
May 2010, Week 2
May 2010, Week 1
April 2010, Week 5
April 2010, Week 4
April 2010, Week 3
April 2010, Week 2
April 2010, Week 1
March 2010, Week 5
March 2010, Week 4
March 2010, Week 3
March 2010, Week 2
March 2010, Week 1
February 2010, Week 4
February 2010, Week 3
February 2010, Week 2
February 2010, Week 1
January 2010, Week 5
January 2010, Week 4
January 2010, Week 3
January 2010, Week 2
January 2010, Week 1
December 2009, Week 4
December 2009, Week 3
December 2009, Week 2
December 2009, Week 1
November 2009, Week 5
November 2009, Week 4
November 2009, Week 3
November 2009, Week 2
November 2009, Week 1
October 2009, Week 5
October 2009, Week 4
October 2009, Week 3
October 2009, Week 2
October 2009, Week 1
September 2009, Week 5
September 2009, Week 4
September 2009, Week 3
September 2009, Week 2
September 2009, Week 1
August 2009, Week 5
August 2009, Week 4
August 2009, Week 3
August 2009, Week 2
August 2009, Week 1
July 2009, Week 5
July 2009, Week 4
July 2009, Week 3
July 2009, Week 2
July 2009, Week 1
June 2009, Week 5
June 2009, Week 4
June 2009, Week 3
June 2009, Week 2
June 2009, Week 1
May 2009, Week 5
May 2009, Week 4
May 2009, Week 3
May 2009, Week 2
May 2009, Week 1
April 2009, Week 5
April 2009, Week 4
April 2009, Week 3
April 2009, Week 2
April 2009, Week 1
March 2009, Week 4
March 2009, Week 3
March 2009, Week 2
March 2009, Week 1
February 2009, Week 4
February 2009, Week 3
February 2009, Week 2
February 2009, Week 1
January 2009, Week 5
January 2009, Week 4
January 2009, Week 3
January 2009, Week 2
January 2009, Week 1
December 2008, Week 5
December 2008, Week 3
December 2008, Week 2
December 2008, Week 1
November 2008, Week 5
November 2008, Week 4
November 2008, Week 3
November 2008, Week 2
November 2008, Week 1
October 2008, Week 5
October 2008, Week 4
October 2008, Week 3
October 2008, Week 2
October 2008, Week 1
September 2008, Week 5
September 2008, Week 4
September 2008, Week 3
September 2008, Week 2
September 2008, Week 1
August 2008, Week 4
August 2008, Week 3
August 2008, Week 2
August 2008, Week 1
July 2008, Week 5
July 2008, Week 4
July 2008, Week 3
July 2008, Week 2
June 2008, Week 5
June 2008, Week 4
June 2008, Week 3
June 2008, Week 2
June 2008, Week 1
May 2008, Week 4
May 2008, Week 3
May 2008, Week 2
May 2008, Week 1
April 2008, Week 5
April 2008, Week 4
April 2008, Week 3
April 2008, Week 2
April 2008, Week 1
March 2008, Week 5
March 2008, Week 4
March 2008, Week 3
March 2008, Week 2
March 2008, Week 1
February 2008, Week 5
February 2008, Week 4
February 2008, Week 3
February 2008, Week 2
February 2008, Week 1
January 2008, Week 5
January 2008, Week 4
January 2008, Week 3
January 2008, Week 2
January 2008, Week 1
December 2007, Week 4
December 2007, Week 3
December 2007, Week 2
December 2007, Week 1
November 2007, Week 4
November 2007, Week 3
November 2007, Week 2
November 2007, Week 1
October 2007, Week 5
October 2007, Week 4
October 2007, Week 3
October 2007, Week 2
October 2007, Week 1
September 2007, Week 4
September 2007, Week 3
September 2007, Week 2
September 2007, Week 1
August 2007, Week 5
August 2007, Week 4
August 2007, Week 3
August 2007, Week 2
July 2007, Week 4
July 2007, Week 3
July 2007, Week 2
July 2007, Week 1
June 2007, Week 5
June 2007, Week 4
June 2007, Week 3
June 2007, Week 2
June 2007, Week 1
May 2007, Week 4
May 2007, Week 3
May 2007, Week 2
May 2007, Week 1
April 2007, Week 5
April 2007, Week 4
April 2007, Week 3
April 2007, Week 2
April 2007, Week 1
March 2007, Week 4
March 2007, Week 3
March 2007, Week 1
February 2007, Week 4
February 2007, Week 3
February 2007, Week 2
February 2007, Week 1
January 2007, Week 5
January 2007, Week 4
January 2007, Week 3
January 2007, Week 2
January 2007, Week 1
December 2006, Week 4
December 2006, Week 3
December 2006, Week 2
November 2006, Week 1
October 2006, Week 4
October 2006, Week 2
October 2006, Week 1
September 2006, Week 4
September 2006, Week 3
September 2006, Week 2
September 2006, Week 1
July 2006, Week 5
July 2006, Week 4
July 2006, Week 3
June 2006, Week 4
June 2006, Week 3
June 2006, Week 2
June 2006, Week 1
May 2006, Week 5
May 2006, Week 4
May 2006, Week 2
May 2006, Week 1
April 2006, Week 3
April 2006, Week 2
April 2006, Week 1
March 2006, Week 4
March 2006, Week 3

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